Election results 2017: full list and map

Voters return a hung parliament

650 of 650 seats declared. July 17, 2017 5:18 pm

Number of seats won

Con
318
Net change
-13
Lab
262
+30
SNP
35
-21
LD
12
+4
DUP
10
+2
326 majority
SF 7 (+3)
PC 4 (+1)
Ind 1 ()
Green 1 ()

Prime minister Theresa May’s gamble on a snap election dramatically backfired: The Conservatives remained the biggest party, but lost their overall majority as voters returned a hung parliament. Mrs May is seeking to form a new government backed by her new Northern Irish allies, the Democratic Unionist party.

vote share chart showing both the conservative party and labour increasing their share of the vote since the 2015 election 36.9 to 42.4% and 30.4 to 40% respectively. Gains primarily at the expense of Ukip who suffer a sharp decline from 12.6% to 1.8%.

Where did the parties lose seats?

Arranging the main parties' constituencies by margin of victory in 2015 allows us to see where, against expectations, the Conservatives lost seats to Labour and the Liberal Democrats.

More vulnerable seats
Safer seats
Con
Lab
SNP
LD
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Margin of victory (%) at last election

Key developments

Kensington

In the final shock of the election, Labour gained Kensington, winning by just 20 votes. The result was the last in the country to be declared after exhausted poll workers were sent home for rest after two recounts.

2015 2017
Candidate Vote share
Lab
Emma Dent Coad 42.2%
Con
Victoria Borwick 42.2%
LD
Annabel Mullin 12.2%
Others
3.4%

Richmond Park

Zac Goldsmith, standing again as a Conservative, re-took Richmond Park by just 45 votes. He lost the seat to the Liberal Democrats in a December 2016 by-election.

2015 2017
Candidate Vote share
Con
Zac Goldsmith 45.1%
LD
Sarah Olney 45.1%
Lab
Cate Tuitt 9.1%
Others
0.7%

Dumfriesshire, Clydesdale & Tweeddale

The Conservatives held the seat, bringing their tally in Scotland to 13 seats and sealing the party’s best return north of the border since 1983.

2015 2017
Candidate Vote share
Con
David Mundell 49.4%
SNP
Mairi McAllan 30.1%
Lab
Douglas Beattie 16.6%
Others
3.9%

Hastings & Rye

Home secretary Amber Rudd narrowly held on to her seat for the Conservatives. Following a recount, her winning margin was confirmed to be a mere 346 votes, down from almost 4,800 in 2015.

2015 2017
Candidate Vote share
Con
Amber Rudd 46.9%
Lab
Peter Chowney 46.2%
Ukip
Michael Phillips 2.7%
Others
4.2%

Twickenham

Sir Vince Cable, who was business secretary in the Coalition government, regained the seat he lost in 2015. Another former Lib Dem minister, Sir Ed Davey, regained neighbouring Kingston. But the Lib Dems will be without Nick Clegg, who lost his Sheffield Hallam seat to Labour.

2015 2017
Candidate Vote share
LD
Vince Cable 52.8%
Con
Tania Mathias 38.0%
Lab
Katherine Dunne 9.2%

Gordon

Taking a prized scalp in the form of the seat held by former SNP leader Alex Salmond, the Conservatives overturned a 2015 SNP majority of 8,600. Angus Robertson and other high-profile SNP members also lost their seats.

2015 2017
Candidate Vote share
Con
Colin Clark 40.7%
SNP
Alex Salmond 35.9%
Lab
Kirsten Muat 11.8%
LD
David Evans 11.6%

Boston & Skegness

Paul Nuttall resigned as Ukip leader after failing to win Britain’s most pro-Leave constituency, where the Conservatives increased their majority. Across the country, Ukip’s share of the popular vote fell from 12.7 per cent in 2015 to 1.8 per cent, and the party finished third in all of its top target seats.

2015 2017
Candidate Vote share
Con
Matt Warman 63.6%
Lab
Paul Kenny 24.9%
Ukip
Paul Nuttall 7.7%
Others
3.8%

Foyle

Northern Ireland swung sharply to the more hardline proponents of unionism and nationalism as Sinn Féin, along with the unionist DUP, crushed their smaller, more centrist rivals. In the most dramatic result, Sinn Féin won Foyle by just 169 votes, ousting the moderate nationalist SDLP.

2015 2017
Candidate Vote share
SF
Elisha McCallion 39.7%
SDLP
Mark Durkan 39.4%
DUP
Gary Middleton 16.1%
Others
4.8%

Ceredigion

Plaid Cymru won one more seat than in 2015 — but only just. The Welsh nationalists gained Ceredigion from the Liberal Democrats by just 104 votes. They also clung on to Arfon, beating Labour by an even slimmer margin of 92 votes.

2015 2017
Candidate Vote share
PC
Ben Lake 29.2%
LD
Mark Williams 29.0%
Lab
Dinah Mulholland 20.2%
Con
Ruth Davis 18.4%
Ukip
Tom Harrison 1.5%
Others
1.7%

Brighton Pavilion

Caroline Lucas, the sole Green party MP, held her seat. Nationally, though, her party suffered: In all but two seats where they were standing, Green candidates gained a lower share of the vote than in 2015. Ms Lucas’ victory took the number of women in the new parliament to 208, a new record.

2015 2017
Candidate Vote share
Green
Caroline Lucas 52.3%
Lab
Solomon Curtis 26.8%
Con
Emma Warman 19.2%
Others
1.7%

Ipswich

Nine Conservative ministers lost their seats. The highest-profile casualty was Ben Gummer, the up-and-coming Downing Street favourite who co-authored the Conservative election manifesto. He had been tipped as a successor to David Davis as Brexit secretary.

2015 2017
Candidate Vote share
Lab
Sandy Martin 47.4%
Con
Ben Gummer 45.8%
Ukip
Tony Gould 2.7%
Others
4.1%

The national picture

LondonOrkney & Shetland

Seats won vs. popular vote

Source: PA

Correction: Due to a rounding error, a previous version of this graphic incorrectly stated that the Green Party won no seats. In fact, one Green MP was elected.